Blog / / 03.23.21

Letter: NGOs, experts call on US to appoint high-level Special Envoy to the Great Lakes & DR Congo

(En français ci-dessous)

In a letter to Secretary of State Antony Blinken, 14 leading NGOs and regional experts expressed deep concern about the growing crisis in the Great Lakes of Africa. In eastern DR Congo, killings of civilians increased by 50 percent over the past year, and armed groups and troops from neighboring countries are present. High-level corruption and impunity in the DRC continue to drive the crises, and there is a real risk that the DRC could descend into another protracted, potentially violent political crisis as the next scheduled elections in 2023 approach.

The experts called on the Biden administration to adopt a regional strategy to address the crisis, including appointing a high-level, well resourced special envoy to coordinate the use of all diplomatic tools, including modernized sanctions, travel restrictions, and anti-money laundering measures, to reduce regional conflict and strengthen the rule of law and democratic governance.  The experts called for the regional strategy to address five main areas:

1) Armed conflicts in eastern DRC and the presence of abusive regional forces and armed groups on Congolese soil;2) The trade in conflict gold and other natural resources that fuels armed violence and corruption and that is smuggled to and refined in Burundi, Rwanda, and Uganda;

3) The need for a vetting mechanism to remove abusive officers from command positions in the Congolese security forces, an effective Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration (DDR) program for former combatants, and a new judicial mechanism to investigate and prosecute those most responsible for widespread human rights abuses;

4) The failure to complete a democratic transition in the DRC and related problems across the region;

5) The use of U.S. financial leverage to complement traditional diplomatic tools to achieve U.S. policy goals of conflict transformation, human rights, and democratic reform – including network sanctions, anti-money laundering measures, and coordination with the private sector.

The full letter is below, and attached here


 

March 23, 2021

The Honorable Antony J. Blinken

Secretary of State

U.S. Department of State

2201 C St NW

Washington, DC 20520

Re: The Need for a High-level U.S. Special Envoy to Implement a Regional Strategy to Address the Crises in Africa’s Great Lakes Region

Dear Secretary Blinken,

We are deeply concerned about the growing crisis in the Great Lakes region of Africa. The longstanding conflict in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has worsened over the past year. Over five million people are now displaced in the country, the third highest level of displacement in the world; conflict-related killings of civilians in the Kivu provinces increased by around 50 percent over the past year; armed groups and troops from neighboring countries are present in eastern DRC; conflict gold and other natural resources are being smuggled with impunity from the DRC to its neighbors, thereby fueling the violence; and the United Nations recently warned that nearly 20 million people are acutely food insecure in the DRC. There is a danger that the violence could further escalate.

At the center of the DRC’s vulnerability to these destructive currents has been its corruption driven state, including its security forces that often violate human rights and collaborate with armed groups, and its failure to hold those most responsible for abuses to account. Congolese civil society groups are calling for the correction of serious flaws in the electoral process that brought President Felix Tshisekedi to power. The country has yet to meaningfully combat high level corruption, systemic violence, and impunity. There is a real risk that the DRC could descend into another protracted, potentially violent political crisis as the next scheduled elections in 2023 approach. Burundi, Rwanda, and Uganda are also at pivotal moments as ruling parties strengthen their grip on power, with space for dissent highly restricted and deepening repression.

Past U.S. special envoys have played a vital role in mitigating conflict and addressing democratic crises in the Great Lakes region, when they were high profile, combined diplomacy with U.S. financial pressure, reported to the Secretary, and were well staffed. Presidents Clinton, Obama, and Trump all dispatched special envoys to provide diplomatic focus on regional conflicts by strengthening cooperation with regional and international partners and informing a coherent U.S. policy. And, along with escalating U.S. and European Union targeted sanctions, efforts by special envoys played a critical role in getting then-DRC President Joseph Kabila to organize elections in 2018 and step down as provided by his constitutionally mandated two-term limit.

Recommendations:

We urge the Biden administration to adopt a rejuvenated regional policy strategy to address these urgent security and humanitarian issues and to once again recognize that their scope and intensity go beyond the remits of capable bilateral ambassadors and require a special envoy. This strategy should particularly address:

1) Armed conflicts in eastern DRC and the presence of abusive regional forces and armed groups on Congolese soil;

2) The trade in conflict gold and other natural resources that fuels armed violence and corruption and that is smuggled to and refined in Burundi, Rwanda, and Uganda;

3) The need for a vetting mechanism to remove abusive officers from command positions in the Congolese security forces, an effective Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration (DDR) program for former combatants, and a new judicial mechanism to investigate and prosecute those most responsible for widespread human rights abuses;

4) The failure to complete a democratic transition in the DRC and related problems across the region;

5) The use of U.S. financial leverage to complement traditional diplomatic tools to achieve U.S. policy goals of conflict transformation, human rights, and democratic reform – including network sanctions, anti-money laundering measures, and coordination with the private sector.

We strongly recommend that the administration appoint a high-level and well-resourced Special Envoy for the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Great Lakes Region of Africa who reports directly to the Secretary of State in order to bolster this strategic approach. A rejuvenated strategy and special envoy will help bring into play the full range of diplomatic tools, including modernized/targeted sanctions, State Department travel restrictions, and anti-money laundering measures, to reduce regional conflict and strengthen the rule of law and democratic governance.

Lastly, we would like to call your attention to an important global interest in President Biden’s foreign policy that a special envoy for the Great Lakes could help address. In this time of global warming, the Congo rainforest – second in size only to the Amazon rainforest – is a precious resource that is threatened by advancing, unregulated agricultural development and deforestation. Supporting efforts to protect the forest in a way that respects the rights of people living and working in the surrounding communities could go a long way in advancing the administration’s broader goals around climate change and in preventing increased food insecurity, fighting over resources, and abusive or illegal exploitation.

We are eager to work with you and a new Special Envoy towards America’s well-founded objectives of strengthening democratic governance, respect for human rights, the rule of law, conflict resolution, and environmental preservation in this important region.

Human Rights Watch

Presbyterian Church (USA), Office of Public Witness

Jacques Ntama Bahati, Africa Faith and Justice Network

Elizabeth Barad, New York City Bar Association

Fred Bauma, LUCHA

Paul Fagan, McCain Institute

Lauren Fortgang, Never Again Coalition

Anthony W. Gambino, Former Mission Director, USAID-DR Congo

Lia Lindsey, Oxfam America

Michael E. O’Hanlon, Brookings Institution

John Prendergast and Sasha Lezhnev, The Sentry

Eric Schwartz, Refugees International

Jason Stearns, Professor, Simon Fraser University, and Senior Fellow, New York University

Stephen R. Weissman, Former Staff Director, House of Representatives Subcommittee on Africa


Nécessité de nommer un envoyé spécial américain pour les Grands Lacs

Lettre conjointe au secrétaire d’État des États-Unis
Monsieur le Secrétaire d’État,

Nous sommes vivement préoccupés par la crise grandissante dans la région des Grands Lacs en Afrique. Le conflit de longue date en République démocratique du Congo s’est aggravé au cours de l’année passée. Le pays compte désormais plus de cinq millions de personnes déplacées, soit le troisième déplacement de population le plus important au monde. Les meurtres de civils liés au conflit dans les provinces du Kivu ont augmenté d’environ 50% sur l’année écoulée ; des groupes armés et des troupes de pays voisins sont présents dans l’est de la RD Congo ; à la faveur du conflit, de l’or et d’autres ressources naturelles sont passés en contrebande en toute impunité vers les pays voisins attisant les violences ; et les Nations unies ont récemment averti que près de 20 millions de personnes sont en situation de grave insécurité alimentaire. Le risque est que l’escalade de la violence continue.

Au cœur de la vulnérabilité de la RD Congo à ces courants destructeurs se trouve la corruption dans les institutions de l’État, y compris les forces de sécurité, qui se rendent fréquemment responsables de violations des droits humains et collaborent avec les groupes armés. À cela s’ajoute l’incapacité de l’État à faire rendre des comptes aux principaux responsables d’abus. Les organisations de la société civile congolaise réclament la correction de graves lacunes du processus électoral qui a conduit le président Félix Tshisekedi au pouvoir. Le pays n’a toujours pas engagé de manière significative la lutte contre la grande corruption, la violence systémique et l’impunité. Il y a un risque réel que la RD Congo puisse sombrer dans une nouvelle crise politique prolongée et potentiellement violente, à l’approche des prochaines élections, prévues pour 2023. Le Burundi, le Rwanda et l’Ouganda voisins se trouvent eux aussi en périodes critiques, avec des partis dirigeants qui renforcent leur emprise sur le pouvoir, un espace de contestation très restreint et une répression croissante.

Par le passé les envoyés spéciaux américains ont joué un rôle essentiel dans l’atténuation des conflits et les efforts de règlement de crises démocratiques dans la région des Grand Lacs, lorsqu’il s’agissait de personnalités connues disposant d’une équipe adéquate, combinant diplomatie et pression financière et rendant compte au Secrétaire d’État. Les présidents Clinton, Obama et Trump ont tous dépêché des envoyés spéciaux sur le terrain pour fournir une approche diplomatique aux conflits régionaux en renforçant la coopération avec les partenaires régionaux et internationaux, et alimentant une politique américaine cohérente. Parallèlement à l’intensification des sanctions ciblées des États-Unis et de l’Union européenne, les efforts déployés par ces envoyés spéciaux ont joué un rôle important pour amener l’ancien président de la RD Congo, Joseph Kabila, à organiser des élections en 2018 et quitter le pouvoir, comme le prévoyait la limite constitutionnelle de deux mandats.

Recommandations :

Nous exhortons l’administration Biden à adopter une stratégie politique régionale appropriée, afin de faire face à ces questions urgentes sur les plans sécuritaire et humanitaire et de reconnaitre un fois de plus que leur portée et leur intensité dépassent les attributions d’ambassadeurs bilatéraux et justifient la nomination d’un ou d’une envoyé(e) spécial(e). Une telle stratégie devrait être axée en particulier sur les points suivants :

  1. Les conflits armés dans l’est de la RD Congo et la présence sur le territoire congolais d’armées étrangères et de groupes armés responsables d’exactions ;
  2. Le commerce de l’or des conflits et d’autres ressources naturelles qui alimente la violence armée et la corruption, et sont passés en contrebande et raffinés au Burundi, au Rwanda et en Ouganda ;
  3. La nécessité d’un mécanisme de vérification afin de déchoir les officiers responsables d’abus de leurs postes de commandement au sein des forces de sécurité congolaises, d’un programme efficace de Désarmement, démobilisation et réinsertion (DDR) pour les anciens combattants rebelles, et d’un nouveau mécanisme judiciaire permettant d’enquêter et de poursuivre en justice les principaux responsables de violations généralisées des droits humains ;
  4. L’incapacité de parachever une transition démocratique en RD Congo et les problèmes connexes dans toute la région ;
  5. Le recours aux leviers financiers américains, en appui aux outils diplomatiques traditionnels, pour atteindre les objectifs politiques américains en matière d’arbitrage de conflits, de droits humains et de réforme démocratique – y compris à des sanctions ciblées sur les réseaux, à des mesures de lutte contre le blanchiment d’argent et à une coordination avec le secteur privé.

Nous recommandons vivement à votre administration de nommer un envoyé spécial pour la République démocratique du Congo et la région des Grands Lacs d’Afrique, de haut niveau et doté de ressources et qui dépende directement du Secrétaire d’État, afin de soutenir cette approche stratégique. Une stratégie remise à jour et un envoyé spécial aideront à mettre en œuvre toute la gamme des outils diplomatiques, y compris des sanctions ciblées et modernisées, des restrictions de voyage émises par le Département d’État et des mesures contre le blanchiment d’argent, afin de réduire les conflits régionaux et de renforcer l’État de droit et la gouvernance démocratique.

Enfin, nous souhaitons attirer votre attention sur un aspect important de la politique étrangère du président Biden qu’un envoyé spécial pour les Grands Lacs pourrait aider à promouvoir. En ces temps de changements climatiques, la forêt tropicale du bassin du Congo – la deuxième plus grande en derrière celle de l’Amazonie – est une ressource précieuse qui est menacée par la progression d’un développement agricole non-réglementé et la déforestation. Soutenir les efforts visant à protéger la forêt, d’une manière qui soit respectueuse des droits des populations vivant et travaillant dans les communautés environnantes, pourrait grandement contribuer à promouvoir les objectifs plus généraux de votre administration en matière de lutte contre les changements climatiques et pour empêcher l’aggravation de l’insécurité alimentaire, la poursuite des conflits autour des ressources naturelles, ainsi que leur exploitation abusive ou illégale.

Nous sommes impatients de travailler avec vous et un nouvel envoyé spécial à l’accomplissement de certains objectifs des États-Unis en matière de renforcement de la gouvernance démocratique, de respect des droits humains et de l’État de droit, de résolution des conflits et de protection de l’environnement, dans cette région importante.

Human Rights Watch

Église presbytérienne (États-Unis), Bureau du porte-parole

Jacques Ntama Bahati, Réseau Africa Faith and Justice

Elizabeth Barad, Association du barreau de New York

Fred Bauma, LUCHA

Paul Fagan, Institut McCain

Lauren Fortgang, Coalition « Never Again »

Anthony W. Gambino, Ancien directeur de mission, USAID-RD Congo

Lia Lindsey, Oxfam America

John Prendergast and Sasha Lezhnev, The Sentry

Eric Schwartz, Refugees International

Jason Stearns, Professeur (Simon Fraser University), Agrégé supérieur de recherches (New York University)

Stephen R. Weissman, Ancien directeur de cabinet à la sous-commission de la Chambre des représentants chargée de l’Afrique