Congo Hold-up is a series of investigative reports by an international consortium of non-profit organizations and media outlets. Millions of leaked bank records obtained by the Platform to Protect Whistleblowers in Africa (PPLAAF) and the French news group Mediapart and shared with The Sentry and other consortium partners by PPLAAF and European Investigative Collaborations (EIC) represent the largest confidential data leak in African history. Visit the Congo Holdup coalition hub: https://congoholdup.com

 

Embezzled Empire

How Kabila’s Brother Stashed Millions in Overseas Properties

Although President Joseph Kabila’s final term as head of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) was set to end in December 2016, he clung to power and delayed elections for another two years. While the eyes of many observers were fixed on the election stalling tactics in Kinshasa, Kabila’s brother Francis Selemani purchased numerous luxury homes in the United States and South Africa, it appears at least in part using funds diverted from the Congolese government.

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Un empire détourné

Des millions de dollars planqués dans l’immobilier international par le frère de Kabila

Bien que le dernier mandat du président Joseph Kabila en tant que chef de l’État de la République démocratique du Congo (RDC) devait s’achever en décembre 2016, il s’est accroché au pouvoir et a retardé les élections pendant deux ans. Tandis que l’attention de nombreux observateurs était focalisée sur les tactiques dilatoires de M. Kabila visant à repousser les élections à Kinshasa, son frère Francis Selemani a acheté de nombreuses résidences de luxe aux États-Unis et en Afrique du Sud moyennant apparemment, au moins en partie, des fonds détournés du gouvernement congolais.

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The Backchannel

State Capture and Bribery in Congo’s Deal of the Century

When China Railway Group and Sinohydro, two major Chinese construction companies, pledged more than a decade ago to help rebuild and expand infrastructure in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in return for a sizeable chunk of the country’s mineral wealth, they took a giant gamble. The multibillion-dollar effort matched President Joseph Kabila’s soaring political ambitions and the nation’s pressing needs for roads, railways, and hospitals, yet its success was far from assured.

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